The Good and Bad of Natural Sweeteners

0
149

Product development is at an all-time high for natural sweeteners such as stevia and monk fruit extracts, as both are experiencing a vast level of commercial success. The story, however, is not as bright for a large number of other natural sweeteners that may never reach approval for commercial sales.

Just Two Natural Alternatives to Sugar

According to director of Connect Consulting and PhD, John Fry, the current state of the natural sweeteners market may not be as bright as originally thought. He presented his report in June 2017 at the IFT17 held in Las Vegas. He stated at the annual convention and exposition that mankind is stuck with stevia and monk fruit as the only two feasible alternatives to sugar, for now at least. John proceeded in his report to show the story of two other natural sweeteners, monatin and brazzein, both of which may be sweet enough to pass as natural sweeteners, but come with complexities in commercialization.

Why Monatin and Brazzein Would Fail

Monatin, for one, is derived from the root bark of a wild plant that may not be feasible for large scale cultivation. The sole process through which monatin could be commercially produced is through fermentation, which is time consuming and costlier than cultivation. Brazzein on the other hand, while being feasible for cultivation is not even close to monatin in terms of the onset of sweetness, according to John Fry. He stated that the onset of brazzein is especially long – over 4 or 5 seconds are required for it to achieve peak sweetness after consumption.

Leave a Reply