New Discovery in Ultra-fast Charging Technology Hints New Energy Age

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Spearheaded by 94-year-old Cockrell School of Engineering professor John Goodenough, the first all-solid-state battery cells have been supposed to be an ideal fit for stationary energy storage, electric cars, and handheld mobile gadgets. This new discovery developed at The University of Texas (UT), Austin has been expected to help fashion longer-lasting, faster-charging, and safer rechargeable batteries. Goodenough’s newest innovation has been completed in association with Maria Helena Braga, a senior research fellow at the Cockrell School. It has been described in a paper published in the Energy & Environmental Science journal.

First All-solid-state Battery Cells Operable below 60 Degree Celsius

The UT Austin battery design has employed glass electrolytes in place of liquid electrolytes, generally used in conventional batteries, to avoid the formation of ‘metal whiskers’ or dendrites while enabling the application of an alkali-metal anode. If a conventional battery is charged quickly, the dendrite formation could pass through its liquid electrolytes, leading to a short circuit and eventually to fires and explosions. Alkali-metal anode could deliver a longer cycle life and raise a cathode’s energy density. The new cells have already demonstrated over 1,200 cycles along with low cell resistance in several experiments.

The solid-glass electrolytes patented via the UT Austin Office of Technology Commercialization have been foreseen to give a fighting fit performance in below zero degree weather conditions since they have a high conductivity, even at -20 degree Celsius. The substitution of lithium with low-cost sodium extracted from widely available seawater is another advantage to cash in on. The newly discovered cells, as proposed, could be formulated from earth-friendly materials.

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