Nanotechnology can add Durability and Rust Resistance to Metals

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Durability, color fading, rust, and damage due to UV radiation have consistently posed challenges for product manufacturers of various sectors including fibers and automotive but now, researchers at the Nagoya Institute of Technology in Japan may have found a long-term solution. Polymer chemists at the Japanese institute have invented a unique and yet simple process that involves nanotechnology and non-ionic polymers to color metals, which leads to enhanced performance, is cheaper, and saves energy. This development is expected to revolutionize the field of electrophoretic painting.

Significant Cost-savings Expected

As a standard, electrophoretic deposition is used by the industries to coat material, particularly to protect against rust. However, it’s a complex, time consuming, and expensive process, which involves three coating steps. The Japanese team have detected that polymers are ideal for electrophoretic deposition and involves only one step, which in turn means significant energy savings. The breakthrough was achieved by adding an accidently found specific chemical group to the non-ionic polymer molecule. The chemical group was discovered while designing a new dental implant material.

Colorlessness Added Trait to Behold

Not only that this coating grows incredibly thick the electrophoretic disposition is done at low voltages, which in turn reduces the repeated steps involved in tradition methods, it also adopts the color of metal it is applied on. In other words, it has a structural color like opal stones, also known as colorless color. The researchers, however, suggest that the wavenumber of the particle must be controlled by interchanging the size of the particles used to coat the surface, which as a result determines the final color.

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