Oilseed Crop Waste Yield Compounds with Sun Protectant Properties

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Meadowfoam- a plant native to Pacific Northwest cultivated for oilseed crop has been found with new skin protecting properties. The oilseed crop has emerged as a new source that can protect the skin from the harmful effects of the sun.

The findings of scientists at Oregon State University are important as nearly 10,000 people each day are diagnosed with skin cancer in the U.S. The occurrence of skin cancer leads to damage to the DNA mainly because of ultraviolet radiation from the sun. Prolonged exposure to the sun can not only cause cancer, but also premature aging of the skin that shows in the form of loose skin and wrinkles.

A highly complex stream of biochemical reactions occur in the skin in response to counteract UV-induced damage, as stated by an associate of the study. However, the need is to come up with better ways to obstruct UV exposure and to lessen the damage by keeping a check on harmful physiological processes.

Researchers Expose UV Rays to Reproduction of Human Skin

Meadowfoam- as the plant is named because of the canopy of creamy-white flowers it bears when in full bloom. It contains glucosinates whose derivatives have shown to possess anti-cancer and properties to protect from sunlight.

Researchers at the College of Pharmacy Oregon State University examined two derivatives obtained from one such glucosinolate that is readily available in the seed meal leftover of meadowfoam oilseed processing. Meadowfoam oil finds industrial applications and is also used in cosmetics and shampoos.

For the study, scientists set up 3-D facsimiles of human skin recreated in culture plates and exposed them with ultraviolet B radiation.

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